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pasalaska

Oh Love (Song of the Week)

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Regarding the pace of this song - it's not what I would term 'slow' in a simple way, it's really fucking slow, the pace is deliberate and emphatic, dragging. It makes you feel impatient, like how people have commented on this sense of waiting for the big explosion that's still out of reach by the end of the song - lol, the climax of one kind or another. Fuckit, this is expressing and amplifying what the words are saying - 'hours and hours, dog years of the day', 'I just can't be satisfied' - the pace is creating that sensation, like 'Static Age' created the nerve-jangling, overloaded chaos its lyrics spoke. This song does more than talk about stuff - it takes you there.

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Ever since Oh Love dropped, I've been trying to figure out why it seems to resonate with me so much. Big-shit-eating-smiles-and-chills-up-your-spine resonating, that is...and this is happening even though a too-sizeable number of other old-school Green Day fans and music reviewers are trying to tell me that the whole song is absolute crap. Yes, the song has a crisp, fresh, sound that we haven't heard from Green Day in a *long* time and introduces small gaps of silence intermixed with an uplifting chorus and powerful harmonies, but there has got to be more to it than that. The track has a curious, slow, "tick - tick - tick - tick" tempo paced using guitar crunches instead of the fiery percussion we are accustomed to expecting from Green Day. What's more, it is filled with vague, spastic, disconnected lyrics that are challenging to interpret -- which makes Oh Love particularly uncharacteristic and unusual even for the always-envelope-pushing Green Day. Yes, in some ways it's the band bringing back a touch of their old-school style, but those lyrics.... They are either absolute nonsense or they're trying to convey something huge -- and whenever Billie Joe Armstrong is the songwriter, I'd put money on the latter.

I posted probably WAY too much in the first single thread yesterday, trying to make some sense out of the lyrics, bouncing back and forth between viewing the song as both a solicitation ("let's get it on, baby!") and a threat ("and if I can't get it on with you I'll just go get it on with someone else!") on the one hand, and as a plea to make the rush of life stand still on the other. Another interpretation that seems to have a lot more support in the lyrics came to my attention offline, from @melissaswebster and a few other fans I follow on Twitter, and I'm finding myself really buying into it -- to the point that I think I understand now why the song resonates so much. Let me try to summarize it here.

We know from the band's recent interviews and all the lead-ups and teasers to Oh Love's release that the U/D/T trilogy is going to be a pretty sexually charged album. We also know that Oh Love will be the final track on Uno, which in context will be setting up a "party from hell" or "party like hell" atmosphere. Dos and Tre are reported to be "At the party" and "The hangover/aftermath", respectively; and a recent rumor has a new song called "See You Tonight" leading off Dos. Now.....Many of us -- myself included -- have sometimes wanted to just say "what the fuck" and do what you want, when you want, "just because", without inhibition, without regard for the consequences, and even though you know those consequences might kill you. That's what Oh Love seems to be aiming at, and I'm finding myself agreeing that it's expressing this urge as an escape from mid-life drudgery via release of no-holds-barred lust -- probably within the context of some "forbidden love" theme that could run the gambit from an "I want who I cannot have" scenario all the way up to a full-blown affair.

Thus far, this is the only interpretation I've come across where the lyrics all start making sense and point in the same direction: Oh Love picks up where Redundant left off back in Nimrod; it sets a course for what sometimes happens "when I love you is not enough" anymore -- and in so doing it way ups the ante, setting itself up as the trilogy's "this is what's wrong and this is how I'm going to fix it" game-changer.

Let's zoom in now for a close look at the lyrics.

Oh love, oh love

Won't you rain on me tonight?

Oh life, oh life

Please don't pass me by

The song opens with our narrator first explaining that he's not living life to the utmost, that he's missing out on a thrill in life that he desperately wants to experience. These verses frame everything that follows in the context of a mid-life crisis.

Don't stop, don't stop

Don't stop when the red lights flash

When that "DANGER, WILL ROBINSON!" alarm goes off in your head this time, ignore it. Just keep going even though every bone in your body's telling you that you're about to make a royal fucking mess of things.

Oh ride, free ride

Won't you take me close to you?

There's the lynchpin: "Free ride". The "out cruising" analogy set up by the flashing red lights, taken to the maximum, yearning for all of the glory without any of the consequences. Maybe another way of expressing this would be the old saying, "why buy the cow when you can have the milk for free?" Add the sexual charge that the tick-tick-tick-tick tempo and rising keyboard chord in the background leading into the chorus both introduce, and this implies someone who has hit the midlife doldrums contemplating escape by taking the plunge with the first pretty little tchotchke that comes walking by.

Far away, far away

The narrator is pleading for escape from his humdrum existence. "Far away", as in "get me the fuck out of here".

Waste away tonight

I'm wearing my heart on a noose

Here our narrator describes not just what he wants to do, but how he's completely aware of the risks he's taking to do it -- and how because of these risks he's been holding himself back. "Waste away" can be taken very literally in that the rewards of, metaphorically at least, "getting wasted" are tremendous; and at the same time the forbidden-love nature of his pursuit of a good time might result in the loss -- the "wasting away" -- of anything and everything he holds dear. Billie Joe uses his gift for wordplay to the fullest right in this lyric. And, yep, his damn conscience is squawking again -- it's the leash that's keeping him contained, the "noose" that's choking off the thrill that he wants his life to be.

Far away, far away

Waste away tonight

Tonight my heart's on the loose.

"Tonight my heart's on the loose" -- setting up the force that lies on the other side of the fear. The drive, the desire, the adrenaline rush, the danger. Picture a pit bull (or, in context of U/D/T, our little horn-dog :eyebrows:) straining against its leash, and you'll get the "I'm wearing my heart on a noose" - "Tonight my heart's on the loose" push/pull dynamic that's going on here. "Oh Love" is our narrator weighing the pros and cons of going for it, fighting his internal battle between conscience and thrill out in the open, right before our ears.

In the next verse, we step back into another set of metaphors for the narrator's longing for where the fun's all at. "Lights and action" is what he craves, and he knows his blah existence won't satisfy his needs. Following this is a snarky labeling of those who actually listen to their intuition and conscience as "losers and choosers". The narrator thus may be branding himself as one of those people and is rebelling against it. He responds "Won't you please hold on my life?" -- or with proper punctuation, "Won't you please hold on, my life?" -- in other words, "take all these boring responsibilites I have and shove 'em."

The next verse, "Oh hours and hours, like the dog years of the day, old story, same old story, won't you see the light of day?" rising back up into the chorus sets up the daily-grind slog that the narrator wants to break free from. Green Day covered some of that territory in Redundant as I mentioned earlier, but Oh Love actually proposes a remedy when the second chorus begins!

Now we're into the bridge:

Talk myself out of feeling

Talk my way out of control

Talk myself out of falling in love

Falling in love with you

Here I think the narrator convinces himself that he doesn't want either commitment or consequences to follow from his lust. He talks himself out of having any real feelings for the object of his desire and persuades himself that he won't actually fall in love with that person. This sets up a classic "friends with benefits" scenario at best, or the ground rules of an affair at worst. His internal conflict reaches the breaking point right here in the bridge, as he "talks my way out of control" -- he disregards whatever's left of his good judgment and throws himself whole-hog after his fresh, new, exciting entrapment.

Following the bridge is a wicked guitar solo, interrupted again by that contemplative, tick-tick-tick-tick guitar-set rhythm. The final verse is the summation: "Oh love, oh love ... Oh ride, free ride" -- a recap of the "fun without the consequences" theme that the entire song is built around -- that sets up the final chorus.

The song ends with "Tonight, my heart's on the loose" repeated three times. The horn-dog has broken free from his leash, urge triumphs over conscience and responsibility, and our narrator leaps at that tasty, low-hanging fruit, setting up a cliffhanger that closes out Uno and leads us into the bender that will become Dos.

....and that brings me back to why this simple, weird little love song seems to be resonating with so many of us. It speaks right to that desire to escape our own lives, our own limitations, whatever the hell happens to be the thing that's holding us back from what we "really" dream of, whatever that dream happens to be -- and importantly, whether or not that dream is actually something good for us. We contemplate, we take baby steps, we choke ourselves on our own noose and pull away again out of fear for the consequences, before we ever have a chance to know what it's like to truly and freely live. Then that chorus and those harmonies crank up. Muusically, they propel us to a place where life is reckless but thrilling, free from consequence and full of fantasy -- and we can't seem to get enough of it.

Many thanks to Melissa and Tanya for helping to blow this puppy wide open for me.

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Damn. I nominate Bastard for "best poster ever" when the next GDC awards roll around. Seriously, every time I see that you posted I am excited to read it. :lol: You guys did an awesome job with the lyrics too.

Also I love the song. It's easy and fun to listen to and is getting me very pumped up for Uno so I'm happy.

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Thanks Michael, Melissa and Tanya for your interpretation. Awesome, really really awesome. And yes, I now also know, and understand, why this song has stuck with me and resonated in my brain.

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Damn. I nominate Bastard for "best poster ever" when the next GDC awards roll around. Seriously, every time I see that you posted I am excited to read it. :lol: You guys did an awesome job with the lyrics too.

Also I love the song. It's easy and fun to listen to and is getting me very pumped up for Uno so I'm happy.

I don't get how he ever ended up with a post/rep ratio of only about 2/1… Always a nice read!

I'm a sucker for probably too complicated and far fetched song meanings :P

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You've definitely put a lot of thought into that, Bastard. The problem is, either you're reading too much into the lyrics or Bille Joe is expressing himself in an uncharacteristically hamfisted way. People seem keen to link the themes and carefree nature of the song to those in 39 and Kerplunk, but almost all of those songs were far more lucid than Oh Love. The sentiments were simple, true, but they at least flowed in some sense. The best dismissal I've seen of these new lyrics is that they read like a page of first lines, with nothing to link them to one another.

Since it just happens to be playing, consider the lyrics of Dry Ice. He was still a teenager when he wrote it, so the universal themes - love, yearning, uncertainty - are expressed in fairly simplistic terms. All the same, the lines represent perfectly understandable poetry. Verse two: "I'll send a letter to that girl asking her to be my own / But my pen is writing wrong, so I'll say it in a song / Oh I love you more right now, more than I've ever loved before / Here are those words straight from these lips, I'll need you forever more".

Compare that sentence, flowing and beautiful in its youthful elegance, to verse two of Oh Love: "Oh lights and action, I just can't be satisfied / Oh losers and choosers, won't you please hold on my life? / Oh hours and hours, like the dog years of the day / Old story same old story, won't you see the light of day?"

The first sentence makes no sense in the context you suggest. If Billie is trying to express dissatisfaction at his current place in life, then the juxtaposition with 'oh lights and action' is muddled and backwards; as structured, it reads like the lights and action are unable to satisfy him. Then comes the second part which, ironically, you had to add your own punctuation to. Even in edited form, "won't you please hold on, my life?" is woeful writing that almost trips over its own inept phrasing. The dog years part is fine, if awkward, but the final sentence is merely another meaningless platitude. Presumably he is willing [the narrator] to 'see the light of day', in which case an editor (Rob?) really should have taken a marker to his shitty sentence construction. Read the entire stanza out loud, and tell me any of it flows properly.

Billie may well be trying to express something profound here, but it reads like he simply pulled lines from a hat and arranged them randomly on the page. I've come to enjoy the song a bit more over the last couple of days (particularly as an anthemic chaser before Dos) and I applaud your efforts to make sense of it, but the wider context reveals only scattergun, throwaway lyrics. I'd argue that's what you might expect Billie to toss off while drunk one night in the studio, if only the majority of Foxboro songs weren't considerably more profound, erudite and cohesive.

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I don't get how he ever ended up with a post/rep ratio of only about 2/1 ... Always a nice read!

Easy - the other half of stuff that I post is usually a load of crap! :lol:

Seriously - Thank you all for the positive feedback on these posts. I'm humbled.

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Thanks Michael, Melissa and Tanya for this brilliant interpretation! I really really really enjoyed reading it. :wub::happy:

bj_bowing.gif

this is basically me, worshiping your talent for writing & interpretations.

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I appreciate your thoughts, and if this were an English class I'd say you have some really good points there. Hell, I still think you have some good points there regardless. But I'd argue this is poetry we're looking at -- and very dense, vague, and condensed poetry at that. So I'll agree it's going to fall flat for some people, as did some of BJ's songwriting on 21st Century Breakdown. That it's not falling flat with everyone -- and instead is having the opposite effect -- suggests that the meat he's packing into this song is (maybe even despite his best efforts?) making it to the surface.

As for the comparison between the straighforward, almost prosaic, style Billie used in the 39/Smooth and Kerplunk days, to his writing on 21stCB and now what little we've seen of Uno, I'd suggest that he's just using a much more stream-of-consciousness and metaphoric style now. If his language were art, it would be more like an impressionist painting or a watercolor than a landscape portrait. It's very artistic, and it's a *lot* harder to "get" because its plain meaning doesn't hit you in the face like his writing did when he was a teenager. Some may say the quality of his songs will suffer because of this, but I feel it elevates them.

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From my own pov, I have no desire to be 'nailing' this song - right now it's tender, all I wanna do is be with it and let it unfold. I don't even think it's a 'nailing' kind of song - like, put it in a box and sum it up. I think that if you do that, you lose what this song is trying to give to you.

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Thanks Michael for that glorious post. I think your analysis will hold even more true once we see what goes down on Dos---if Oh Love is the contextual bookend to Uno and the cliffhanger for Dos, it would make sense that this song that you're ostensibly saying is about temptation will lead into "It's Fuck Time," and perhaps regret as on "Stray Heart," where we know the lyrics reflect that kind of yearning and regret "Everything that I want/I want from you/but I just can't have you" combined with "I'll never stray again from you."

At the same time, it makes me uncomfortable to overanalyze to such a degree, and place too much explicit meaning on the songs, especially as they pertain to Billie's life. He's mentioned how Redundant, as you said, was kind of about the rut you get into when you're in a long-term relationship (so obviously, he was explicitly referring to his real life situation)... if "Oh Love" is the next step, then maybe he's sharing too much information :P And for that reason, although he's one of the most honest songwriters for whom vanity is never an issue (Case in point, The Grouch: "I don't have sex cause I can't get it up"), I do think it's less specific. That MTV interview that came out today, where he mentions "going crazy" and thinking with your crotch instead of your head, obviously reflects in a less poetic way everything you just explained, and I think you did a better job than Billie of capturing the complexities of that emotion. At the same time, I think even though you've uncovered what's going down in "Oh Love," it likely was written as a somewhat incomplete stream of consciousness that perhaps Billie himself never managed to make total sense of in the way that you did. I think he might benefit from your analysis. Sit him down on a couch and tell him how he really feels :P Nevertheless, if it's possible, you may have dug too deep. As PaulS said, overanalyzed... but I admire it a lot.

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Ever since Oh Love dropped yesterday, I've been trying to figure out why it seems to resonate with me so much....

I honestly love reading your posts! But this oneblew my mind entirely. I hadn't had the time to sit an analyse the lyrics myself yet, but now I feel I no longer have to. Seriously, one or two of my brain cells might have just orgasmed. :lol:

On an entirely different note (because after Bastard of 1967's posts I don't feel the need to add anything to the discussion of the song :P)....

Wow, what an idea! The song of the week is the single released earlier the same day! :D

Well I thought it ws a pretty obvious choice for song of the week this week. I would of been like "whaaaa? Oh Love is not song of the week?" if they had chosen soemthing else. So don't really get all the comments about this :P

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Interesting thoughts again, Bastard. You're putting more effort into this than Green Day did ;)

As for the comparison between the straighforward, almost prosaic, style Billie used in the 39/Smooth and Kerplunk days, to his writing on 21stCB and now what little we've seen of Uno, I'd suggest that he's just using a much more stream-of-consciousness and metaphoric style now. If his language were art, it would be more like an impressionist painting or a watercolor than a landscape portrait. It's very artistic, and it's a *lot* harder to "get" because its plain meaning doesn't hit you in the face like his writing did when he was a teenager. Some may say the quality of his songs will suffer because of this, but I feel it elevates them.

I don't think there's anything prosaic about his earlier work (which, for the purposes of this, I'll take to mean from Warning backwards). The sentiments are simple, certainly, but the manner in which they're expressed is at once powerful and heartfelt. Moreover, not only do the lyrics read well, they sing well. Even the more reasonable lines in Oh Love often sound clumsy, as though he's straining for a rhyme. I suppose that is why I have an issue with the notion of this being an impressionist piece of work: he is very clearly working within the traditional boundaries of a pop song, just doing it badly. He isn't breaking into new forms here, rather he has forgetten how to write well.

Your suggestion that this is a stream-of-consciousness song is probably more accurate - one need only listen to Billie talk to realise his strengths lie in reflection, not in spontaneous discussion. We make light of his frequent 'ya know' speech patterns, but songs like this are merely the lyrical form of that. When he sits down and really works through a lyric, I think he can be one of the great mainstream songwriters. When he doesn't - which used to be very rare - we get this and, to a lesser extent, Know Your Enemy.

Again, I don't dispute that he might be trying hard to say something with those two songs, but whatever it is he's not getting there. You make reference to this song having much in common with his lyrics on 21CB, but I've just checked again and almost all of them are perfectly understandable, despite his increased reliance of sloganeering and metaphor. Even the most complex ideas can be made understandable; indeed, it is the mark of a great writer that he or she is able to do so. Billie has done it before - in Jesus of Suburbia, most notably - but this fails to relay even the simplest of messages.

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Even the most complex ideas can be made understandable; indeed, it is the mark of a great writer that he or she is able to do so.

I would really challenge the second part of what you've said there - l don't think there's any obligation on an artist to make things explicable to people. You make it, and you present it, and people either get it or don't. If they don't, chances are that they'll lay the blame on you, but all that matters is that you're true to yourself and that you give expression in whatever form that expression comes.

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I think it's important to remember that Billie Joe himself says "I think most of my lyrics don't make sense anyway"... they don't make sense to him, they make even less sense to us (or in Michael's case, they make sense ;) ) Like justcause says, he has no obligation to explain himself (least of all when he has no idea why he wrote what he wrote), because he doesn't know himself half the time. That's what art is... it's kind of like when you're bored and doodling in class... sometimes you're like "I'm going to draw a flower," and other times you just start drawing and before you know it you've got some batshit crazy design and you start to wonder what's wrong with you and where the fuck this imagery is coming from. Then you hand in your notebook and have no answer for your teacher as to why you drew a hexagon with seven arms and an octopus leg.

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I'm in love with this song. The more I listen to it, the more I relate to it. The lyrics are good, the music is catchy and the solo is just WOW ! The chorus works like a magic in the song. I'm hooked to the chorus. And the falsetto fits in the song too. I'm in love with it. That's it.

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Okay, something is really bothering me, so I'm just going to throw it out there.

I'm about 95% convinced that the correct lyrics to the bridge are;

Talk Tug myself out of feeling

Talk Tug my way out of control

Talk Tug myself out of falling in love

Falling in love with you

I know it's kind of arrogant to assume the official (3D!) lyric video is incorrect, but whenever I hear the song I think back to that "laserbeams shooting out of the titties" video where Billie hums a line which I at the time clearly percieved as "tug my way out". I too hear a distinct pronunciation of the word talk/tug in the song, which i guess could be an alternative way of pronouncing talk, but on the other hand a perfect pronunciation of the word tug which is more of a short "tuck" compared to talk which is more like a longer, less sharp "tork". From a poetic standpoint I think this alternative also adds a bit more depth to the bridge and makes the imagery a bit more interesting. (I for example imagine a guy being dragged (tugged) backwards by a rope, arms reaching out, in a sharp pull fashion according to the beat of the music)

When I see the official lyrics posted inside of the iUno! CD-case, I will accept it if I'm proven wrong, but until then I believe it's not impossible that whoever made the youtube video at Warner could have wrote the lyrics out by ear, and the band had nothing to do with that product at all. But what do you think, do you also hear a little ticke-di-tug in there?

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Okay, something is really bothering me, so I'm just going to throw it out there.

I'm about 95% convinced that the correct lyrics to the bridge are;

Talk Tug myself out of feeling

Talk Tug my way out of control

Talk Tug myself out of falling in love

Falling in love with you

I know it's kind of arrogant to assume the official (3D!) lyric video is incorrect, but whenever I hear the song I think back to that "laserbeams shooting out of the titties" video where Billie hums a line which I at the time clearly percieved as "tug my way out". I too hear a distinct pronunciation of the word talk/tug in the song, which i guess could be an alternative way of pronouncing talk, but on the other hand a perfect pronunciation of the word tug which is more of a short "tuck" compared to talk which is more like a longer, less sharp "tork". From a poetic standpoint I think this alternative also adds a bit more depth to the bridge and makes the imagery a bit more interesting. (I for example imagine a guy being dragged (tugged) backwards by a rope, arms reaching out, in a sharp pull fashion according to the beat of the music)

When I see the official lyrics posted inside of the iUno! CD-case, I will accept it if I'm proven wrong, but until then I believe it's not impossible that whoever made the youtube video at Warner could have wrote the lyrics out by ear, and the band had nothing to do with that product at all. But what do you think, do you also hear a little ticke-di-tug in there?

I'm sorry to say this, but you are completely wrong. The word he sings IS actually "Talk". It just sounds to you like "Tug" because that's how most Americans pronounce the word. They don't pronounce it the "British" way as in "Tork".

Also I'm definitely sure the lyrics video has the correct lyrics, since it is the OFFICIAL video put out by the band's youtube account, and probably had access to Billie's actual lyrics written himself, instead of trying to decipher the lyrics by ear like we all have been doing since the Red 7 live recording.

:)

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Here all of you are really digging into the meaning of this song, and all I came here to say is that I love how it teeters on that fine line between being super slow and catchy enough to bounce to.

But then again I suck at analyzing stuff and love songs whose lyrics aren't completely obvious upon the first listen.

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I don't have much to say about this song... Well, that people haven't already said 20x better than me. So, I will respond with a response deep from my heart. I (oh) love this song.

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I'm very pleased with the sound in Oh Love, though I'm still trying to make up mind up about the lyrics.

This:

Your suggestion that this is a stream-of-consciousness song is probably more accurate - one need only listen to Billie talk to realise his strengths lie in reflection, not in spontaneous discussion. We make light of his frequent 'ya know' speech patterns, but songs like this are merely the lyrical form of that. When he sits down and really works through a lyric, I think he can be one of the great mainstream songwriters. When he doesn't - which used to be very rare - we get this and, to a lesser extent, Know Your Enemy.

...is something I've been thinking about but couldn't quite put to words.

That said, at the moment, I'm leaning more toward being okay with the lyrics - largely because of the way Billie sings the lines. And I expect better things coming from the trilogy, so no worries at all.

(OT I'm always glad to see some love for Billie's 39/Smooth and Kerplunk writing.)

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I'm very pleased with the sound in Oh Love, though I'm still trying to make up mind up about the lyrics.

This:

...is something I've been thinking about but couldn't quite put to words.

That said, at the moment, I'm leaning more toward being okay with the lyrics - largely because of the way Billie sings the lines. And I expect better things coming from the trilogy, so no worries at all.

(OT I'm always glad to see some love for Billie's 39/Smooth and Kerplunk writing.)

Exactly.... the music carries the song where the lyrics fail, and we will have TONS of really fascinating, awesome lyrics coming. It'll probably escalate too, with Tre having the most interesting lyrics (99 Revolutions is about Occupy Oakland after all, so it'll probably be like the writing of 21CB). Little Boy Named Train already promises to be fascinating, in my view. I think the lyrics to Amy are beautiful and explicit and symbolic all at once. Considering the music of Oh Love is so beautiful, it's hard to care right now that the lyrics may have fallen short for most of us.

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Fuck my computer got a virus the day the Green Day tour rumor got out =(. I couldn't listen to the song exactly at 6, but I did get to when the radio played it at 7:10 =). Haha I got up just to listen to Green Day and went back to sleep. Not my favorite Green Day song, but it's good! Can't wait to hear what they have in store for us.

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i was pretty mixed when i first heard it but the more i listened to it the more i fell in love with it. such a good song.

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I don't have much to say about this song... Well, that people haven't already said 20x better than me. So, I will respond with a response deep from my heart. I (oh) love this song.

Amen to this. :bunny:

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