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Listen to Static Noise 94: We give our thoughts on Demolicious.

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#31
Ritz

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Aye, this is true. We've all been guilty of being assholes at times out of ignorance on what we were dealing with. I suppose in cases like those what matters most is to listen and to learn from it.


Agreed !

#32
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Nicely put Frank.

While we're at it, I'd like to point out that using the word

retarded

isn't the same as saying ignorant or stupid.

"Retarded" is used as a pejorative against people with mental disabilities (the word came into popular use as an adjective after "mental retardation" became an official diagnosis for a psychological condition). Seen this one around a fair bit from various people, please stop.

#33
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Nicely put Frank.

While we're at it, I'd like to point out that using the word
isn't the same as saying ignorant or stupid.

"Retarded" is used as a pejorative against people with mental disabilities (the word came into popular use as an adjective after "mental retardation" became an official diagnosis for a psychological condition). Seen this one around a fair bit from various people, please stop.

wouldn't you say xenophobia is a mental issue?

#34
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The only issue I take with that is words like "idiot", "imbecile", and "moron" used to be clinical descriptions of having a mental disability as well, which they are no longer but quite alright for use, and as far as I know the psychological/medical community is now rejecting clinical use of the word "retarded" and no longer wants it to be a scientific or professional term.

If someone genuinely feels insulted by the word then I wouldn't use it in their presence, although, I think some words implying lack of intelligence should remain valid insults. And if we all can agree the word "idiot" is fine, then that basically implies something like "retarded" will be fine in twenty or thirty years when it is considered a completely antiquated term no longer part of the modern medical lexicon.

I just like everyone to have the proper context, it's not that I am a passionate or frequent user of the word "retard" or anything.

#35
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I guess it's like with any other derogatory word, it's not ours to reclaim.

#36
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That is very true, I am just saying, it seems the only issue with the term is time, that it is still relevant to certain people and offends them, whereas the word "idiot" does not.

#37
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Yeah, I agree.

#38
Rosie May

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What does the * at the end of trans* mean? Is that for transgender and trans without the * is for transsexual?

#39
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What does the * at the end of trans* mean? Is that for transgender and trans without the * is for transsexual?


Asterisks at the end a word always mean the same thing, that anything could follow the word. Transgender or transsexual is properly an adjective, not a noun, so saying trans* could imply transman, transwoman, or could also imply other things if the person is not transitioning to a binary gender at all.

#40
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What does the * at the end of trans* mean? Is that for transgender and trans without the * is for transsexual?

The asterisk is used as a "wildcard symbol" in an attempt to be inclusive of everyone, including transsexual, transgender, bigender, genderqueer etc.
It's a way of acknowledge all gender variant people.


EDIT: John beat me. :P

#41
Rosie May

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^Oh right thanks, it 'twas confusing me.

#42
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The asterisk is used as a "wildcard symbol" in an attempt to be inclusive of everyone, including transsexual, transgender, bigender, genderqueer etc.
It's a way of acknowledge all gender variant people.


And what is the difference between all those things you listed?
I must confess that up until this moment I always thought that transsexual and transgender meant the same thing, and first time I've ever read genderqueer. :P See, I'm quite a huge ignorant when it comes to these topics :(

#43
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And what is the difference between all those things you listed?
I must confess that up until this moment I always thought that transsexual and transgender meant the same thing, and first time I've ever read genderqueer. http://www.greendaycommunity.org/public/... See, I'm quite a huge ignorant when it comes to these topics http://www.greendaycommunity.org/public/...

Transsexual is used to refer to people who are medically assigned "male" or "female" but do not identify that way, so a transsexual male would've been assigned female at birth and a transsexual female would've been assigned male at birth. And usually they go through a physically transition to feel more comfortable in their gender.
A transgender person is someone who does not identify with how they were assigned at birth, although it's used more of an umbrella term so it could mean either a trans man, or a trans woman, or it could be a non-binary gender.
Genderqueer is an identity that a person takes on who feels that they do not fit in the binary system of "male" and "female."
Bigender is both man and woman, I believe.

When you explore gender itself, you'll find many new concepts and terms and I'm by no means educated in the non-binary field to feel comfortable talking about it, but I hope this clears up some things. It's really interesting, ok. :P

#44
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Well, I know genderqueer is an umbrella term for people whose genders don't fit the binary.

#45
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i came here for boobs... :lol:

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#46
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We all did. It's a lie. It's a lie, they tricked us. :(

#47
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I'm greatly enjoying the learning that's going on here :)

#48
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I respect you so much for this. Go Frank!

#49
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This is really interesting to learn more about. I don't want to insult anyone out of ignorance. Thank you for this Frank!

#50
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Bigender is both man and woman, I believe.

I think, like bisexual, it can be any two genders (but is probably most usually male and female).

http://gender.wikia.com/wiki/Bigender

#51
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I think, like bisexual, it can be any two genders (but is probably most usually male and female).

Oh, aye.

Getting educated by my own penis. :wub:

#52
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wouldn't you say xenophobia is a mental issue?

No. It's an issue of ideas and opinions, not a natural state of the brain. Maintaining cruel opinions doesn't necessarily imply a lack of intellectual ability either, if a person is in a position of privilege it can be beneficial to them to spread hateful ideas in order to keep others in a position of subservience.

#53
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The only issue I take with that is words like "idiot", "imbecile", and "moron" used to be clinical descriptions of having a mental disability as well, which they are no longer but quite alright for use, and as far as I know the psychological/medical community is now rejecting clinical use of the word "retarded" and no longer wants it to be a scientific or professional term.

If someone genuinely feels insulted by the word then I wouldn't use it in their presence, although, I think some words implying lack of intelligence should remain valid insults. And if we all can agree the word "idiot" is fine, then that basically implies something like "retarded" will be fine in twenty or thirty years when it is considered a completely antiquated term no longer part of the modern medical lexicon.

I just like everyone to have the proper context, it's not that I am a passionate or frequent user of the word "retard" or anything.

The problem is, pretty much as soon as a new term for intellectual disability is invented it's appropriated as a slur. Words like "retarded", "spastic" and "mongoloid" are still widely regarded as offensive, whether the victims of such terms are present or not. They may no longer be official medical terms but the implications are still there. I don't think the answer is to continue using the words until they become assimilated into acceptable speech.

With words such as "idiot", "imbecile", and "moron" it's a bit more complex because they are so old and the original meanings are less well known, although I have seen a person take offense to the word "moron" with regards to it being an old clinical definition. In reality, if you are attacking someone's intellectual ability or "lack of intelligence", whether you're using appropriated medical terms or not you're displaying animosity towards the same characteristic. I mean, I'm not gonna call out every time someone calls someone an idiot or whatever but I have started avoiding such terms myself because when I think about it it seems kinda lazy and inappropriate. If you gave me an example of where you'd use such words I might be able to form a better opinion, although maybe it's a subject for another thread/PM since I don't wanna derail Frank's lovely thread.

#54
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I'll support you no matter how hairy your body gets.

#55
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The problem is, pretty much as soon as a new term for intellectual disability is invented it's appropriated as a slur. Words like "retarded", "spastic" and "mongoloid" are still widely regarded as offensive, whether the victims of such terms are present or not. They may no longer be official medical terms but the implications are still there. I don't think the answer is to continue using the words until they become assimilated into acceptable speech.

With words such as "idiot", "imbecile", and "moron" it's a bit more complex because they are so old and the original meanings are less well known, although I have seen a person take offense to the word "moron" with regards to it being an old clinical definition. In reality, if you are attacking someone's intellectual ability or "lack of intelligence", whether you're using appropriated medical terms or not you're displaying animosity towards the same characteristic. I mean, I'm not gonna call out every time someone calls someone an idiot or whatever but I have started avoiding such terms myself because when I think about it it seems kinda lazy and inappropriate. If you gave me an example of where you'd use such words I might be able to form a better opinion, although maybe it's a subject for another thread/PM since I don't wanna derail Frank's lovely thread.

Isn't Idiot a old greek term for "not interested in politics"?
I don't really care, when I say retarded, I mean dumb. And it IS dumb that some people hate, because of the reasons I already listed.
Dumb probably comes from something else that's offensive to someone else, and the flame war continues. I'm not gonna try and tip-toe around every time I make a statement, people get what I'm trying to say, and that's all I really care about.

I don't get mad when people say "go hang yourself" or something because I've been suicidal.

#56
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I'll support you no matter how hairy your body gets.

I have the cutest happy trail, and I thought I had a decent amount of leg hair until *someone* pointed out that they thought it would be more.

But this thread is not about my body hair. :P

#57
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The problem is, pretty much as soon as a new term for intellectual disability is invented it's appropriated as a slur. Words like "retarded", "spastic" and "mongoloid" are still widely regarded as offensive, whether the victims of such terms are present or not. They may no longer be official medical terms but the implications are still there. I don't think the answer is to continue using the words until they become assimilated into acceptable speech.

With words such as "idiot", "imbecile", and "moron" it's a bit more complex because they are so old and the original meanings are less well known, although I have seen a person take offense to the word "moron" with regards to it being an old clinical definition. In reality, if you are attacking someone's intellectual ability or "lack of intelligence", whether you're using appropriated medical terms or not you're displaying animosity towards the same characteristic. I mean, I'm not gonna call out every time someone calls someone an idiot or whatever but I have started avoiding such terms myself because when I think about it it seems kinda lazy and inappropriate. If you gave me an example of where you'd use such words I might be able to form a better opinion, although maybe it's a subject for another thread/PM since I don't wanna derail Frank's lovely thread.


There's first the issue of regional dialects. "Spastic" isn't considered offensive by anyone in the USA and I think, from what I understand, is used in a bit of different context here than it is in the UK. "Mongoloid" isn't in common usage over here although I wouldn't use a term based on racist pseudo-science anyway.

The difference is for me, when I feel it is okay to attack someone on the basis of what I call low intelligence; I'm not going to have any problem with people who lack cognitive abilities or are developmentally lagging through no fault of their own, although if someone is fully capable of learning something, or acting in a decent way, but they just fucking don't because they're obstinate, bigoted pricks, then I hold them in contempt for that.

And to some extent I don't want to exactly say people are 'uneducated', because that might be taken in a context, someone who goes to college is better than someone who didn't, or someone who went to a prestigious university is better than someone who went to a community college, which I absolutely reject. Because I don't fault people for lack of opportunities.

But someone in the Western World who is totally literate and has access to the internet and basically infinite information, who is going to say they believe in creationism, or that homosexuality is wrong, quite frankly they often disgust me and my contempt for them, which I blame on their 'stupidity', is quite intense.

#58
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Ask permission to ask questions.

  • Do not ask questions that in any way challenge the trans person’s gender identity or expression or could obviously lead to dysphoria.
  • Do not ask what the person’s birth name was.
  • Request specific permission to ask questions relating to genitalia

This annoys me. Why can't someone just not answer a question if it's not something they want to talk about? Why do people have to be so fragile when asked a goddamn question? I don't go into panic mode when someone asks about my sexuality and it's still something I'm not that comfortable with. Questions don't hurt, and most people here ask questions out of sincere curiosity, not to be offensive.

#59
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It all goes down to a case of respecting someone's privacy, and some of the questions asked may be particularly triggering to people. It's unfair to simply tell them to stop being so fragile, when you have no idea what they're going through to begin with. Some questions do hurt, even if the person who asked did not have that intention. You just have to be aware of that.

#60
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You've clearly never gone through dysphoria.

It all goes down to a case of respecting someone's privacy, and some of the questions asked may be particularly triggering to people. It's unfair to simply tell them to stop being so fragile, when you have no idea what they're going through to begin with.


That is no different than most others who go through their own struggles, emotional or otherwise. I don't understand how asking a question is harmful or offensive. Privacy is up to the individual, they choose their privacy by deciding what they will or won't share. No one can force them to share more than they want. If someone asks a question, again out of sincere curiosity, then what's the problem? If you don't' want to answer it, that's perfectly fair and I think anyone here would accept that.

Example: I remember someone asking a while back when you were going have gender-reassignment surgery or whatever. Then you explained that not every person going through this decides to have that surgery. I'd rather have someone ask a question and be corrected about the premise of their question, than tell them "you're safer just not asking anything. stay ignorant, just in case you unknowingly say something upsetting." I just don't think that's a good attitude to have.



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