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Stereotyping and Individuality

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#31
Penguin Puffball

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WHY WOULD YOU WANT SOMETHING OFFENSIVE AND MEAN TO PLEASURE YOU HOW HYPOCRITICAL

:lol:

#32
Graysen

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There is a fine line between stereotyping and prejudice; however I think more emphasis is put on the negative aspects of stereotyping that ultimately leads to prejudice and discrimination.

Stereotyping is defined as a collection of beliefs and impressions held about a group and its members. These collection of beliefs could either be positive or negative. Most often, people have beliefs about how a member of a given group will act, and this will often lead to the 'self-fulfilling prophecy effect' whereby a person will act in accordance to those expectations or beliefs held about that person and their group and thus reinforces the stereotype held about them.

We're always trying to make sense of our environment therefore we often categorize the things and people around us. Stereotyping is useful in the sense where we can place people in groups that 'make sense'. However, as we know, this process often ends up being hurtful.

The prejudices we develop about people and groups are not impossible to reduce. Awareness and exposure to people from stereotyped groups is an important method to remove the negative associations we develop.
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#33
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Tralala

I love you :hug: this is dead on.
When I said stereotypes were negative, that's my assumption from past experiences.

#34
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Awareness and exposure to people from stereotyped groups is an important method to remove the negative associations we develop.


I wish that was true. There was a girl at my old school who, upon not getting any accommodation at University, wondered why. Then we discovered that she had written she didn't want to share her halls with any "gays, black people or ethnic minorities"... She HATES gay people for apparently no reason and she's been around me and my friends for years (and we're very open minded about things). She also said if she ever met a transsexual she would kill them. I'm not sure whether exposure would help in that case.

#35
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I love you http://www.greendaycommunity.org/public/... this is dead on.
When I said stereotypes were negative, that's my assumption from past experiences.

Haha! Just wanted to add my two-cents.


I wish that was true. There was a girl at my old school who, upon not getting any accommodation at University, wondered why. Then we discovered that she had written she didn't want to share her halls with any "gays, black people or ethnic minorities"... She HATES gay people for apparently no reason and she's been around me and my friends for years (and we're very open minded about things). She also said if she ever met a transsexual she would kill them. I'm not sure whether exposure would help in that case.

Oh, it's definitely not true in every case or all cases. Some people are just so inclined to stick with their negative impressions of groups that they don't want to open their minds to the actual truth about others. Exposure would certainly not help in her case, but if she actually took the time to learn about the groups she hates then maybe things could change.

#36
Dylan.

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My view on stereotypes is that when you grow up, you tend to realize that all the stereotypes you have heard are the result of ignorance. However, I find stereotypes funny. They are the basis for what jokes are made out of. It is the people that are too immature to realize when a stereotype is just a stereotype that you have problems. You see these southerners, and morons using stereotypes as if they actually describe people...and it truly amazes me.

I honestly think stereotypes are like anything else. In the wrong hands, they are a weapon. In everyone else's hand, it's not a big deal.
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#37
fukingcounterstrike

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My view on stereotypes is that when you grow up, you tend to realize that all the stereotypes you have heard are the result of ignorance. However, I find stereotypes funny. They are the basis for what jokes are made out of. It is the people that are too immature to realize when a stereotype is just a stereotype that you have problems. You see these southerners, and morons using stereotypes as if they actually describe people...and it truly amazes me.

I honestly think stereotypes are like anything else. In the wrong hands, they are a weapon. In everyone else's hand, it's not a big deal.

show me a black man that doesn't like fried chicken and or watermelon and I'll show you...... uh...... my penis

#38
Amanda

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show me a black man that doesn't like fried chicken and or watermelon and I'll show you...... uh...... my penis


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#39
melissawebster

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Haha! Just wanted to add my two-cents. Oh, it's definitely not true in every case or all cases. Some people are just so inclined to stick with their negative impressions of groups that they don't want to open their minds to the actual truth about others. Exposure would certainly not help in her case, but if she actually took the time to learn about the groups she hates then maybe things could change.


See, I'm inclined to say this girl's problem isn't stereotyping certain groups. Wouldn't she just flat-out be a bigot? That's the difference someone said earlier that people should distinguish between. Stereotyping isn't necessarily negative, but bigotry and prejudice is always negative. And no, from personal experience, I've learned that bigots cannot be reasoned with or changed through exposure. Unless it's some kind of extreme situation, like life and death, and then maybe they can be "shocked" into a different mindset.
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#40
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At the same time, we should also remember that stereotypes aren't around for no reason. They either exist a) to keep a group of people down or b) because past experiences have shown them to be at least partially true. A lot of times it's both

#41
melissawebster

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^Good point. I'm guilty of it myself. I often joke about the stereotypes about Southerners, mostly because it's so often applied to me and I don't take it too seriously. And I think it's okay to an extent. As long as a person doesn't take it to the extreme and use it as an excuse to discriminate and harass people, or be an asshole, as someone so succinctly put it.

#42
Amanda

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Southerners idea of social networking = a couch on the front lawn... (where's Julie Jones when I need her?)

#43
melissawebster

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Southerners idea of social networking = a couch on the front lawn... (where's Julie Jones when I need her?)


:rofl:

See, now technically, that's a subset of Southerners generally referred to as rednecks. And then you have cajuns, who's idea of social networking is gator wrastling down on the bayou.

And then there's the other end of the spectrum with the Junior League set, who's idea of social networking is maintaining the time-honored tradition of the mean girl set through daily luncheons and exclusive clubs.

Oh wait, I forgot about the mullet toss. Good times. :D

#44
Radithor

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And I'm stereotyped all the freaking time just because I'm from Alabama. It ranges from racist to uneducated to misinformed to Republican/conservative.

At least you're not from Utah. Then you'd clearly be one of dem God hating polygamists with faulse idols.
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#45
Dylan.

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show me a black man that doesn't like fried chicken and or watermelon and I'll show you...... uh...... my penis

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Show me your penis, Mark.
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#46
fukingcounterstrike

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you kidding me... i know that guy loves watermelon.... suuure he may not be as dumb and lazy as the rest........... :mellow: too far with this whole bit?????
























NEVER... smarts don't make him immune to watermelon :p
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#47
Radithor

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Been reading through this topic, and as for the difference between stereotypes and prejudice, it certianly exists. However, they seem to go hand-in-hand at times, and one can lead to the other very quickly. I've faced this difference in my own workplace, with the supervisor constantly telling me "leave that to the guys, that's surely no fun for a girl like you." I face very similar lines multiple times daily, and every time he speaks to me, all I ever hear is "you have a vagina and they have penises. That clearly makes you inferior." Keep in mind that I have more muscle mass than the men I'm working with. They're all very weedy, and I work out every couple of days. But actual bodily strength doesn't seem to matter to this man. He's got into his head that women are weak and inferior no matter what. And there's nothing that can be changed about this.

Someone mentioned earlier that stereotypes cannot be changed when they've gotten into someone's mind. I beleive stereotypes can very quickly be changed in someone's mind with exposure to certian groups: It's this deep, harmful prejudice which can not be changed.
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#48
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show me a black man that doesn't like fried chicken and or watermelon and I'll show you...... uh...... my penis


See now that's just not fair. Who doesn't like fried chicken and watermelon? :p

#49
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See now that's just not fair. Who doesn't like fried chicken and watermelon? http://www.greendaycommunity.org/public/...

I was thinking the same myself really :lol:

#50
Dylan.

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Ahem. Not that I'm not a bit guilty of getting a little off topic. But if we could get back to the conversation, that'd be great. :)
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#51
Radithor

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Ahem. Not that I'm not a bit guilty of getting a little off topic. But if we could get back to the conversation, that'd be great. http://www.greendaycommunity.org/public/...

Yeah guys, you're just not giving me enough to work with here. :p

However, the number I'm on hold to currently just did. I'm not sure how big this is in the US, but here in Australia there's all kinds of stereotypes around people on govornment welfare payments. The biggest one being, if you're on them, you don't want to work. Though the statistics show otherwise... more than 80% of those on Centrelink would happily get a job if they could. Yet it's still asumed that everyone on the payment wants to be. Tell me, who wants to go all the way out of their day for 5 minute "personal contact interviews" so that they can prove you still exist? It's an asumption that doesn't even make sence anymore, and hasn't been true since the 80's.

#52
melissawebster

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Yeah, that's the general assumption among conservatives here in the States as well, despite the fact that the statistic is something like one job for every four applicants.

#53
BJA TC MD

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I don't like stereotyping. We should be treated as individuals. I know people who break stereotypes, like a blonde who is intelligent. Also, Facebook generation? I'm not on Facebook and I don't want it. This generation should not be stereotyped because of that.
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#54
Eponine

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It's interesting how much stereotyping naturally affects the way people approach and deal with one another. I find that people often have a hard time sussing me out the first time I meet them, because I don't fall into a single category. I'm a straight A English nerd, but involved in the underground music scene, and also an adventurous heavy drinker. People from my English lecture are totally stumped when I start telling them about getting drunk before class during high school, or having outdoor sex in a field in some hick town. They just can't pick it, and it does genuinely affect the way they treat me.

What I think, is that stereotyping isn't something you can really avoid, it's just how our brains have learnt to cope with the ridiculous influx of information we have to deal with on a day to day basis. But people need to be careful to make sure that they don't base everything on first impressions. As long as you're aware of the process, you can make sure that it doesn't run your perception of life.

#55
fiercecircus

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two things (i just woke up from a nap and i'm all fuzzy forgive me):

1- sometimes stereotypes are true and that's okay. I know a lot of gay people and a lot of the girls are butch and boyish and a lot of the boys are FAAAAABULOUS! But the fabulous boys are GREAT! Sometimes it's true that theater people are all fags- ok so maybe not ALL of them are queer but it does tend to attract people who think creatively, outside the box, and i guess gay people are just intuitively like that. But i don't think a stereotype is necessarily a bad thing unless it leads to prejudice.

2-it's prejudice that's a problem. and as a functioning adult i have not experienced it in a long while... but after i lost my job this summer i decided to go a little wild and dye my hair pink (it was awesome.) LET ME TELL YOU, PEOPLE TREATED ME TOTALLY DIFFERENTLY! I had been spending some time in and out of various doctors offices... and zomg, they were SO NASTY TO ME at my doctors office when i had pink hair and wore crazy band shirts. COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PEOPLE! It was really awful! Then, i went there a few days ago (with my hair back to normal brown) and it was like, no problem, and they were totally polite to me. TOTAL FUCKING PREJUDICE! When i had the pink hair they treated me like dirt, like obviously i was some punk-ass lazy kid with an attitude. But nothing had changed- i was still a 31 year old adult, with a mortgage and a car and a career (sorta.) I still paid my bills on time and didn't do drugs. WHAT IS THE PROBLEM WITH ME HAVING PINK HAIR???

it was crazy. i hadn't experienced that kind of prejudice in a long time- it was like being a teenager all over again! And i hate to say it- but i feel a lot more comfortable now with my hair color back to normal. At least i know that i can walk into a place of buisiness and get the same service as other "normal" people. *grumble*

#56
Radithor

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it's prejudice that's a problem. and as a functioning adult i have not experienced it in a long while... but after i lost my job this summer i decided to go a little wild and dye my hair pink (it was awesome.) LET ME TELL YOU, PEOPLE TREATED ME TOTALLY DIFFERENTLY! I had been spending some time in and out of various doctors offices... and zomg, they were SO NASTY TO ME at my doctors office when i had pink hair and wore crazy band shirts. COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PEOPLE! It was really awful! Then, i went there a few days ago (with my hair back to normal brown) and it was like, no problem, and they were totally polite to me. TOTAL FUCKING PREJUDICE! When i had the pink hair they treated me like dirt, like obviously i was some punk-ass lazy kid with an attitude. But nothing had changed- i was still a 31 year old adult, with a mortgage and a car and a career (sorta.) I still paid my bills on time and didn't do drugs. WHAT IS THE PROBLEM WITH ME HAVING PINK HAIR???

I agree with you on the stereotype vs prejudice point. Stereotypes aren't really harmful, more annoying than anything. Though I experianced EXACTLY the same thing as you when I got my mohawk a few months ago. (I still have it.) I went to that from shoulder-length dyed red hair. And the way people treated me chamged compleatly. I went from never needing to show ID for anything (by anything I mean everything from wine to bus tickets) to needing to show it all the time. People went from greeting me nicely to expressing a snarl when I approached. It's just like... if I was a respectable and trustworthy person before, surely I'm still one now? Apparently, my actual reliability doesn't count for anything. Because now I'm all punk and shit.

#57
fiercecircus

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it was a total eye opener. i mean, it didn't happen everywhere (when i was hanging out in Vermont it was business as usual but people are more liberal and the town i hang in is super-hippy...) But in Connecticut, holy crap. ESPECIALLY when i was dealing with unemployment issues- i had to have my dr. fill out some paperwork for me to get unemployment and everyone was SO nasty about it. Like, OH OBVIOUSLY YOU'RE UNEMPLOYED BECAUSE YOU'RE IMMATURE PUNK SCUM. When the reality of it was that I WAS UNEMPLOYED BECAUSE I HAD TOO MANY ABSENCES BECAUSE I WAS SICK AS HELL FOR 7 DAYS because of this damn chronic condition which is why i come to SEE THE DAMN DOCTOR IN THE FIRST PLACE! (oh, and because my old boss is a dick, but that's another story.)
It's like, wtf guys! Seriously, it turned my freaking stomach. They had no freaking respect for me. It's almost not worth it to be "different". It is really rather funny the way i can change my image like a chameleon though- i can wear tank tops and show off my tattooed arms and look like a badass, or i can put on dress pants and a button down shirt and it's all business, but nobody knows what's going on inside or underneath. Mwahahha.

#58
Nobody Likes Cam

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I think *pretty much* everyone is stereotypical at one point or another in their lives, even if you don't realize it. I think that if you label someone/a group of people as something, you're insulting them and saying pretty much "Okay, life has little groups and this is the group you fit into, this is what you can prove, this is what you do. I know from expericance that stereotyping is insulting (I get emo and goth and a sped all the time) and that sometimes, if people put you like into a category, it makes other people stay away, or make sure to ignore you. I try my hardest not to be stereotypical when I'm around people, because I know how annoying it can be.
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#59
Vesper

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I think the thing that a lot of people stereotype people on is tattoos. Agree? Or is that prejudice against what tattoos used to stand for?

#60
anarchistgirlscout

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I try not to judge people by their tattoos - even the content (homophobic, white power, etc.). I figure that maybe that represents their past, but not their present, so I have to look past it to the person in front of me and find out what they're like.
However, I'd be lying if I said that those sorts of tattoos with a hateful content or message didn't make me cautious around that person, even if I am extending the benefit of the doubt.
Likewise, I don't assume because someone has body art that I find aesthetically pleasing that we are going to be best friends.
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