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solongfromthestars

¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré! Song Meanings & Interpretations

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maryjanewhatsername

This is awesome and there is so much to process here :lol:

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Beerjeezus

Okay excuse me my mind is fucking blown by this. I've seen the artwork but didn't know it was for an official campaign and for once, I must say this was a cool idea. Promotion??? Of MY band? Did it really happen?

https://www.laurasantolaria.com/work/green-day/

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Christian's Inferno!
1 hour ago, solongfromthestars said:

Troublemaker

“Troublemaker and Rusty James are kind of like a fuck you to the old punk scene and the old guard a little bit. There are so many people who get to our age and they become bitter, and maybe their life isn’t going the way they want it to. That’s what those songs are about. There’s a fine line between being an angry young man and being a bitter old fart, you know?” - Billie Joe Armstrong (source)

Wild One

Unused lyrics:

She’s my favorite colour now
She kills me with kindness
She’s kissing me mindless now

Dirty Rotten Bastards

Unused lyrics:

Send me your crippled sucking on the nipple
The teet of the modern age
You're tired you're troubled making it a double
Of snapshots from a long lost wage

I’m just a rambler a hurdy gurdy gambler
A love sick and filthy swine
We’re torn up in tatters we’re dirty rotten bastards
Singing for the deaf dumb and blind

The kids are all busted
A life interrupted
A mantra in dirty deeds
For the private world

 

Really Billie? I don't see how the lyrics from Troublemaker are about that at all? :lol:

"I wanna get inside of you, I wanna crack your cranium delirium"
"I like your BMW. I like your BM-excellent tits with a tattoo of a pig sniffin' glue"
"You're living at the W. You're looking like a Jezebel hot as hell, sunburnt in a pink bathing suit"
Or like... any of the other lyrics

Those unused lyrics are interesting. Are you sure those were lyrics from Wild One or is that just an assumption based on the use of the word 'She'?

It kinda bothers me that the lyric "Dirty rotten bastards" was written but isn't in the final version of the song. Does it bother anyone else? :lol:

Well done @solongfromthestars for the effort you put into this

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hym.jarred

"We are the vultures, the dirties kind. The culture war is in your heart and your mind" I feel is the best, most honest lyric on the trilogy.  Green Day are vultures for your money and division is ingrained in all of our psyche.

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solongfromthestars
5 hours ago, Christian's Inferno! said:

Really Billie? I don't see how the lyrics from Troublemaker are about that at all? :lol:

"I wanna get inside of you, I wanna crack your cranium delirium"
"I like your BMW. I like your BM-excellent tits with a tattoo of a pig sniffin' glue"
"You're living at the W. You're looking like a Jezebel hot as hell, sunburnt in a pink bathing suit"
Or like... any of the other lyrics

Those unused lyrics are interesting. Are you sure those were lyrics from Wild One or is that just an assumption based on the use of the word 'She'?

It kinda bothers me that the lyric "Dirty rotten bastards" was written but isn't in the final version of the song. Does it bother anyone else? :lol:

Well done @solongfromthestars for the effort you put into this

That was always my thought when I saw that quote :lol: I was thinking today though maybe it's mocking the way they live now? Like they were preaching about punk and selling out back in the scene but now they're "living at the W" and being sleazy on the beach. Or he could be bragging about doing things that aren't "punk" as a fuck you? I'm not sure though because the "lower east side of your/my mind" comes back in Makeout Party, so it seems to be part of the story.

I'm pretty sure that shot is cropped and they were part of a bigger one including the used Wild One lyrics. I'll have to check Cuatro though.

It bothers me the title isn't in the song when it was at one point :P I like the lyrics "I’m just a rambler a hurdy gurdy gambler / A love sick and filthy swine / We’re torn up in tatters we’re dirty rotten bastards" too. Should have made it in.

Thank you!

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maryjanewhatsername
1 hour ago, hym.jarred said:

"We are the vultures, the dirties kind. The culture war is in your heart and your mind" I feel is the best, most honest lyric on the trilogy.  Green Day are vultures for your money and division is ingrained in all of our psyche.

I would disagree. Green Day doesn't make music for the money. They make music for themselves. They love music and its their passion. 

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Sarcasm

"Good god, I wish I was 25 again" 

 

the end

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SumDay

I think it's debatable to what extend these lyrics and (even more) their interpretations/comments are actually of any sense or meaning. I really don't want to sound rude, but I think in the making of these records were more drugs involved than at the Jaded gig in Chicago. 

It always felt to me like they kinda had this concept of a trilogy but not really any content for it. This led them to writing try-hard-provocative songs like "Loss Of Control" "Let Yourself Go", forcing this sexual-tension thing in it and so on. 

I hope I don't piss anyone off with this, I don't really want to bash the trilogy - but I'm not a fan of it, as it was by far the unhealthiest time for the band. 

You know, I doubt Billie - writer of American idiot - really thinks that "If you really dive inside the records, there's a real story to tell." considering the "story" either being "¡Uno! is feeling like your heart is on fire. On the second record, you start losing control. By ¡Tré! your heart will feel like a flamethrower. It gets really hot." or  "With the first album, you're getting in the mood to party. On ¡Dos! you're at the party. And the third album... you're cleaning up the mess.". 
But you could try to see the trilogy in a psychological way. Lazy Bones as one of the raw, true moments mirroring the broken soul of an alcoholic who tries to cover it up in a 'mess' of songs that try to capture and prove that he is cool and young.
Again, no bad blood. I love and adore Billie and the band. And of course I am open to (and actually hoping for) any differing interpretations or opinions. 

 

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Beerjeezus
6 hours ago, hym.jarred said:

"We are the vultures, the dirties kind. The culture war is in your heart and your mind" I feel is the best, most honest lyric on the trilogy.  Green Day are vultures for your money and division is ingrained in all of our psyche.

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Beerjeezus
1 hour ago, SumDay said:

I think it's debatable to what extend these lyrics and (even more) their interpretations/comments are actually of any sense or meaning. I really don't want to sound rude, but I think in the making of these records were more drugs involved than at the Jaded gig in Chicago. 

It always felt to me like they kinda had this concept of a trilogy but not really any content for it. This led them to writing try-hard-provocative songs like "Loss Of Control" "Let Yourself Go", forcing this sexual-tension thing in it and so on. 

I hope I don't piss anyone off with this, I don't really want to bash the trilogy - but I'm not a fan of it, as it was by far the unhealthiest time for the band. 

You know, I doubt Billie - writer of American idiot - really thinks that "If you really dive inside the records, there's a real story to tell." considering the "story" either being "¡Uno! is feeling like your heart is on fire. On the second record, you start losing control. By ¡Tré! your heart will feel like a flamethrower. It gets really hot." or  "With the first album, you're getting in the mood to party. On ¡Dos! you're at the party. And the third album... you're cleaning up the mess.". 
But you could try to see the trilogy in a psychological way. Lazy Bones as one of the raw, true moments mirroring the broken soul of an alcoholic who tries to cover it up in a 'mess' of songs that try to capture and prove that he is cool and young.
Again, no bad blood. I love and adore Billie and the band. And of course I am open to (and actually hoping for) any differing interpretations or opinions. 

Your post and the one above it are kind of saying the same thing and I'm afraid you're both right. :lol: Whatever was the story meant to be, the real story the albums tell is a story of an "old" dude who gets involved in all kinds of stuff like drugs, partying and girls while being pissed at everyone and then eventually has regrets. It's not that far from what Billie has said the albums were like but it sounds way less marketable.

In my opinion there's some artistic value in it. The lyrics don't reflex these themes, they're more like a report from the place where it's happening. There's no irony in the embarrassing and bad lyrics. It's authentic. That's not making it a masterpiece in any way, but I think he accidentally wrote an album with a slightly different story than the one he intended. Trilogy indeed has that metaphor of a party but it's not as lighthearted as they said it would be.

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pacejunkie punk

I think the Trilogy is no different from every other GD album in that it paints a picture of what he was going through at the time. He’s said that all of his songs are a like a journal or diary. Is it any darker or substance fueled than Insomniac or Nimrod?

I don’t think it was forced though, in fact the time he spent with the American Idiot musical cast (besides making him feel old and wishing he were 25 again) also was a very creative and inspiring time for him where he said he would perform in the show and then go home and write every day. It’s how he ended up with 50-60 songs or more. The quality may vary and some of the content may seem like fantasy or nonsense but they are just as honest as much of his darker material in the past.

 I do agree that he may not have realized he was writing such dark material but that’s certainly how it came out, much like the Foxboro Hot Tubs actually, a fiery wreck that presents itself as a party. 

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Beerjeezus
12 minutes ago, pacejunkie punk said:

I think the Trilogy is no different from every other GD album in that it paints a picture of what he was going through at the time. He’s said that all of his songs are a like a journal or diary. Is it any darker or substance fueled than Insomniac or Nimrod?

I don’t think it was forced though, in fact the time he spent with the American Idiot musical cast (besides making him feel old and wishing he were 25 again) also was a very creative and inspiring time for him where he said he would perform in the show and then go home and write every day. It’s how he ended up with 50-60 songs or more. The quality may vary and some of the content may seem like fantasy or nonsense but they are just as honest as much of his darker material in the past.

 I do agree that he may not have realized he was writing such dark material but that’s certainly how it came out, much like the Foxboro Hot Tubs actually, a fiery wreck that presents itself as a party. 

Yes, I agree, it depicts his life at the time and trying to keep up and party like he's 25 was likely a part of it. I don't think he was forcing it to produce lots of material, but he's said something like that he was being prolific for the sake of being prolific and I think what he meant was that he was inspired and wrote lots of songs some of which were sub-par, instead of writing less and crafting more. In fact it's perfectly in sync with the partying and doing everything in an extreme way in general. I have a feeling that the part of Dirty Rotten Bastards where he just repeats he got "carried away" over and over sums up the whole record, both the story it tells and the way it's been written.

There are moments where trilogy is very dark, but I agree it's not an exception in their catalog. I insist that Lazy Bones is the most depressing song he's written though. This is just my interpretation, but I think it's about complete resignation - he says he doesn't want any help but also wants to stop feeling the way he does. I think it's about accepting death - not being suicidal, but being like "whatever, I just don't want to suffer." That's just really hopeless.

Yeah, trilogy and fbht have the dark party theme in common, but Foxboro seems to be written from a different perspective. It has hyperbole (for example Ruby Room seems almost ironic) while the trilogy is more serious. But I agree they are similar and some foxies song are very dark too.

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solongfromthestars
5 hours ago, SumDay said:

I think it's debatable to what extend these lyrics and (even more) their interpretations/comments are actually of any sense or meaning. I really don't want to sound rude, but I think in the making of these records were more drugs involved than at the Jaded gig in Chicago. 

It always felt to me like they kinda had this concept of a trilogy but not really any content for it. This led them to writing try-hard-provocative songs like "Loss Of Control" "Let Yourself Go", forcing this sexual-tension thing in it and so on. 

I hope I don't piss anyone off with this, I don't really want to bash the trilogy - but I'm not a fan of it, as it was by far the unhealthiest time for the band. 

You know, I doubt Billie - writer of American idiot - really thinks that "If you really dive inside the records, there's a real story to tell." considering the "story" either being "¡Uno! is feeling like your heart is on fire. On the second record, you start losing control. By ¡Tré! your heart will feel like a flamethrower. It gets really hot." or  "With the first album, you're getting in the mood to party. On ¡Dos! you're at the party. And the third album... you're cleaning up the mess.". 
But you could try to see the trilogy in a psychological way. Lazy Bones as one of the raw, true moments mirroring the broken soul of an alcoholic who tries to cover it up in a 'mess' of songs that try to capture and prove that he is cool and young.
Again, no bad blood. I love and adore Billie and the band. And of course I am open to (and actually hoping for) any differing interpretations or opinions.

I think perception of the trilogy as an especially unhealthy era is warped by it being the time when Billie's issues came to a head. Of course, some people simply don't like the music or lyrics and that's fine. I totally understand why some fans are uncomfortable with it because of what happened, too. But 21st Century Breakdown for example was equally, if not more unhealthy. Christian's Inferno, ¿Viva la Gloria?, Restless Heart Syndrome and Horseshoes & Handgrenades are about similar things, they're just more eloquent. It sounds like writing Nimrod was more stressful than the trilogy since he did it all in the studio and again, Hitchin' a Ride, Uptight, Walking Alone, Platypus and Take Back have similar content.

There are definitely trilogy songs that seem shallow in meaning or entirely silly/nonsensical. I'd cite Let Yourself Go, Fuck Time and maybe Troublemaker (unless it really is a piss take of the punk scene and then it makes more sense). I was going to say Loss of Control but whilst it's one of my least favourite trilogy songs, it's arguably got more to it than Let Yourself Go - since it's not just saying "fuck off" but about feeling antisocial and cutting off old friends.

The rest I don't disbelieve are part of a loose story about a forbidden relationship between the narrator and the "Wild One," who seems to come up in The Longshot too. I think the love and self-reflection songs are authentic. They might be a bit sloppy or unfocused at times, but that's part of their charm because they're not at all filtered, it's just raw emotion. I actually believe some of them are Billie's best love songs. Brutal Love - which is arguably up there with their very best work - takes first place, but also:

  • Fell For You, capturing the infatuation of a new and forbidden love
  • Wild One, describing the girl as ruthless, manic and unstable to the point it's a bit frightening, without being disrespectful
  • Baby Eyes, warning his lover how destructive he is
  • Wow! That's Loud, using the girl's fashion sense to describe her intense personality and how she makes him feel
  • 8th Avenue Serenade, which really feels like a secret, intimate serenade

X-Kid is for sure my favourite self-reflection song. When I saw it live Billie's voice cracked after the solo and I've never forgotten how hard that hit me (video). I feel like they had another go at Sex, Drugs & Violence with Too Dumb To Die, which I do think is better. But I still appreciate the place of authentic self-reflection and acceptance I think Sex, Drugs & Violence came from.

I don't think Billie was lying when he said there's a lot to discover when you dive into them. I could (and will when I have more time) write a lot about my interpretations of these songs. In the meantime, check out these by a (now inactive) member of GDC:

I don't agree with all of her interpretations, but it's definitely interesting and nice to see someone (other than me) investing time into dissecting the trilogy.

Anyway, no need to apologise for your opinion. Discussion is what the thread is for and you're certainly not the only person who dislikes the trilogy :P 

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DadBod
45 minutes ago, Jane Lannister said:

There are moments where trilogy is very dark, but I agree it's not an exception in their catalog. I insist that Lazy Bones is the most depressing song he's written though. This is just my interpretation, but I think it's about complete resignation - he says he doesn't want any help but also wants to stop feeling the way he does. I think it's about accepting death - not being suicidal, but being like "whatever, I just don't want to suffer." That's just really hopeless.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who finds Lazy Bones extremely dark and hopeless. I have the same feeling about the "I just don't want to suffer" connotation.  

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Beerjeezus
13 minutes ago, solongfromthestars said:

I thought Lazy Bones was the one trilogy song everyone agreed on as being good but heartbreaking. I can never really listen to it as background music because there's something even about the tune that feels hopeless. State of Shock is similar (though not as good) and sad too.

Same. It's the minor chords + upbeat melody. And I agree about State Of Shock, it's similarly hopeless.

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Christian's Inferno!

Yeah I don't see how anyone could argue that Lazy Bones isn't dark

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Beerjeezus

I feel like the impression that that time wasn't the best for the band also has something to do with the fact that the albums aren't as perfectly crafted as 21CB and AI. It looks like they didn't pay as much attention to quality control and detail, so that can make it look like everything wasn't okay. Other albums were also reflecting personal problems of all kinds but they were critically better acclaimed, so no one had the reason to assume the personal issues may have influenced the music negatively.

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Rumpelstiltskin2000

I don't think the love songs are necessarily meaningless as Billie actually added a few of them to the Longshot sets? Just a thought

4 hours ago, solongfromthestars said:

X-Kid is for sure my favourite self-reflection song. When I saw it live Billie's voice cracked after the solo and I've never forgotten how hard that hit me (video). 

I remember this. It almost made me cry

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Hermione

One thing I think helps bring the song meanings of Uno Dos Tre to light more sharply is Revolution Radio. It's a real follow up (in a way that say a concept album wouldn't be) that covers coming "out the other side" of addition and problems and for example listening to a song like Still Breathing brings a deeper meaning to a song like Lazy Bones, as well as to the "fun" songs that perhaps aren't so fun. Uno/Dos/Tre and Rev Rad give each other deeper meaning, I like to listen to them together.

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DadBod

Well said, @Hermione. That was one of the first things I noticed about RevRad was the self reflection but in a much more positive way. The opening line to RevRad is kind of bleak, but as it goes on you see the hope build to Forever Now. Which I love to death. God, it's such a damn good song. I had tears when I saw it live.

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maryjanewhatsername

I really don't feel super qualified to comment on song meanings for the trilogy, but I feel like the one I might be able to interpret is "The Forgotten". I feel like it is really similar to the Beatles' song "Eleanor Rigby", which talks about lonely people. And I don't mean people that feel lonely, I mean the people in our society that are for some reason isolated or seen as weird. And I feel like this song could talk about either this, or forgotten memories.

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Extra Ordinary Boy

 

6 hours ago, Rumpelstiltskin2000 said:

I don't think the love songs are necessarily meaningless as Billie actually added a few of them to the Longshot sets? Just a thought

I find the Trilogy the most interesting of all of the Green Day records. There’s a lot there in theme and meaning than just a bunch of party songs. There’s something dark and sad and lost about those records. Does anyone else think it’s interesting that Fell For You was released as a remix in 2017 and then the Longshot record came out in 2018? And the Trilogy songs ending up on the Longshot set list.

Edited by Extra Ordinary Boy
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