Jump to content
I don't care

Confessions

Recommended Posts

Beerjeezus

Speaking of kid leashes - they're a pet peeve of mine. Just...no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Khaleesi.

I dunno, I don't really have an issue with them. In places like Disney for example, it would be nice to let your kid run around batshit crazy and excited, but still be able to have a handle on them. :confused:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Billie Hoe

I kinda have an issue with them but I also understand why people are using them. It takes some pressure off of you for not having to constantly look over your shoulder and see where they're running off to, but on the other hand you could also just... teach them not to run away. I don't know, I think it's kind of humiliating for the child, because leashes are only associated with dogs or cats (and even for those it's weird). I've never seen someone use a leash for their child and if I did, I'd probably give them a really judgy look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beerjeezus

I understand the idea and that it's practical, but at the same time it looks dehumanizing and I can't help feeling uncomfortable when I see it.

2boys.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
maryjanewhatsername
14 minutes ago, Jane Lannister said:

I understand the idea and that it's practical, but at the same time it looks dehumanizing and I can't help feeling uncomfortable when I see it.

 

I agree. Teach your children, don't leash your children. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Second favourite son
1 hour ago, Jane Lannister said:

Speaking of kid leashes - they're a pet peeve of mine. Just...no.

Depends on age of child and length of leash

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
walking_c0ntradicti0n
47 minutes ago, Khaleesi. said:

I dunno, I don't really have an issue with them. In places like Disney for example, it would be nice to let your kid run around batshit crazy and excited, but still be able to have a handle on them. :confused:

This is the only time I've ever seen it in person and I wasnt too triggered because it was Disney over thanksgiving break and that shit is CROWDED

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
o_O
12 hours ago, Hermione said:

What would be the reason for needing to tell your family and friends what your kinks are? Like if it's in your head it's in your head, if you're in a relationship with someone it's between you and them.

Edit: Just realised what "pacis" are, this does rather sound like trolling

it's a very intricate kink really. i understand people will be weirded out like adults who are in a relationship and their age gap is 30 years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adorkable
1 hour ago, Second favourite son said:

Depends on age of child and length of leash

Coming from a parents standpoint. NO FUCKING WAY. My children were not dogs. It is a parents responsibility to keep an eye on their children and leash is not the way to do it. If you feel like you cannot keep a handle on your children in a certain situation do not put them in that situation.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Misfit xo

I had a bookbag type of "leash" for my daughter... Only used it once, when she was 2 years old and we went to an extremely crowded amusement park.  It wasn't really a leash though, but a monkey bookbag with a tail that you held onto. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
maryjanewhatsername
10 minutes ago, Emilie said:

I once irl saw a guy walking his gf on a leash and it’s the only time I’ve actively wanted to lose my eyes 

clorox-bleach-4460030770-64_1000.jpgs690641436103943294_p1_i4_w286.jpeg

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Khaleesi.
6 hours ago, Misfit xo said:

I had a bookbag type of "leash" for my daughter... Only used it once, when she was 2 years old and we went to an extremely crowded amusement park.  It wasn't really a leash though, but a monkey bookbag with a tail that you held onto. 

This is what I was thinking of. Not those sad ones posted above :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hermione
15 hours ago, Second favourite son said:

Depends on age of child and length of leash

Yeah it depends on the family's situation. If there's a lot of kids, they're very young, maybe some are harder to control than others etc and they might be going somewhere particularly crowded it could be useful as a safety feature. It doesn't mean they're not also teaching the kids to be safe and not to run away, it can just be an extra that makes it easier in some situations. Say if you had a 5 year old, 4 year old and 2 year old at a theme park and one or more of them had a behavioural disorder, it could just make the day more enjoyable to rule out something like two of them running off in different directions lol. I know it's hard enough to look after one young kid and how they can run off (because they all have to learn and don't all learn instantly the first time they go out), with 2 or 3 in the mix or even just one depending on the individual kid's needs I think it's totally understandable. 

 

16 hours ago, Billie Hoe said:

you could also just... teach them not to run away. 

This takes time lol. If you have a toddler they will try to run away at times. And any kid can accidentally walk the wrong way/wander off without realising they've gone too far/get distracted and not follow etc. Like with my nephew it was fine because there was pretty much always someone holding his hand. But multiple kids...you literally can't have your eye on all of them at once every second so I don't even know how people do it :lol:. If they're still learning and particularly if they're going somewhere more crowded than usual I get it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Emilie

A lot of kids, especially autistic kids, go through a fleeing phase. They just run randomly. They also have trouble understanding the concept of roads and traffic, so they will just run into the street. I’d much rather have a kid on a leash than a kid running off near roads 

my brothers friend has just gotten back into a fleeing phase and it’s terrifging cause he’s older now and like a foot taller than his mum. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DeJennsitized

I don't see the problem myself. It's not harmful to the child in any way, gives them freedom to explore without having their parents gripping them by the hand, means the parent is able to see them at all times, and avoids dangerous situations. (This is based on the assumption that the leash is somewhere comfortable on the child, like attached to a strap around their middle, not around their neck :lol:)

Of course you can teach a child about safety, but this is no different to pulling them back by the hand. As long as you're not yanking it and mis-using it to deliberately hurt the child, I see it as a compromise between letting them run free and strapping them in a buggy/carrying them around. Some toddlers are too young to understand fully about road safety, so having the safety net of a leash as you teach them until they understand sounds like a great idea to me? Like, how do you teach a child about looking both ways without physically stopping them before they cross? Is a leash not good for practise until you're sure they know to wait before crossing? 

The comparison to a dog I don't get either. You're not humiliating your dog when you put it on a leash, it's for their safety. Why is it suddenly degrading for a child?  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hermione
7 hours ago, DeJennsitized said:

I don't see the problem myself. It's not harmful to the child in any way, gives them freedom to explore without having their parents gripping them by the hand, means the parent is able to see them at all times, and avoids dangerous situations. (This is based on the assumption that the leash is somewhere comfortable on the child, like attached to a strap around their middle, not around their neck :lol:)

Of course you can teach a child about safety, but this is no different to pulling them back by the hand. As long as you're not yanking it and mis-using it to deliberately hurt the child, I see it as a compromise between letting them run free and strapping them in a buggy/carrying them around. Some toddlers are too young to understand fully about road safety, so having the safety net of a leash as you teach them until they understand sounds like a great idea to me? Like, how do you teach a child about looking both ways without physically stopping them before they cross? Is a leash not good for practise until you're sure they know to wait before crossing? 

The comparison to a dog I don't get either. You're not humiliating your dog when you put it on a leash, it's for their safety. Why is it suddenly degrading for a child?  

It can be possible to do it by holding their hand whenever you're walking near a road. But that would be much more difficult with more than one child or if the child wasn't into holding hands etc so yeah seems like a good alternative to me. I guess the other alternative is keeping them strapped in a buggy for longer but that doesn't seem much better, using a "leash" (where I'm from they're not even called leashes with a dog connotation, they're called reins :P) could even mean you can teach them earlier.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adorkable

I absolutely agree that putting your kid on a leash would make it easier in certain situations. However, a large part of parenting is teaching your kids how to behave. There is a time to run around like crazy and there is time not too. The kids need to learn the difference. If the child is not ready to be in a certain type of situation, such as a large crowd, then you don't take them there. If you take them there and they don't act accordingly, you remove them. It is a learning experience. There were many times I had to leave somewhere early, or not go because one or more of my kids were not listening. If you do something, like put them on a leash, where they can just do whatever they want with no consequences, how do they learn?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DeJennsitized
20 minutes ago, Adorkable said:

I absolutely agree that putting your kid on a leash would make it easier in certain situations. However, a large part of parenting is teaching your kids how to behave. There is a time to run around like crazy and there is time not too. The kids need to learn the difference. If the child is not ready to be in a certain type of situation, such as a large crowd, then you don't take them there. If you take them there and they don't act accordingly, you remove them. It is a learning experience. There were many times I had to leave somewhere early, or not go because one or more of my kids were not listening. If you do something, like put them on a leash, where they can just do whatever they want with no consequences, how do they learn?

 

There's nothing to stop you teaching your child to behave in public whilst still having the leash/rein on them in case they run off and you can't find them. Taking them away if they continue to run off can still happen - I'd just consider the leash as a safety net. And certain kids just can't be taught for any number of reasons (ADHD, special needs) so I think it's good to have it as an option. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adorkable
5 minutes ago, DeJennsitized said:

There's nothing to stop you teaching your child to behave in public whilst still having the leash/rein on them in case they run off and you can't find them. Taking them away if they continue to run off can still happen - I'd just consider the leash as a safety net. And certain kids just can't be taught for any number of reasons (ADHD, special needs) so I think it's good to have it as an option. 

I agree when the child is a special needs child but definitely don't when the child is not. The leash makes it too easy not to behave. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adorkable
11 minutes ago, fukingcounterstrike said:

I prefer to lobotomize my kids when the time comes to control them

That definitely works

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hermione
12 minutes ago, Adorkable said:

I agree when the child is a special needs child but definitely don't when the child is not. The leash makes it too easy not to behave. 

It doesn't though because you can take the exact same action if they misbehave or try to escape etc if they have the reins on. Just like how you can still teach them about not running away and road safety if you're holding their hand as opposed to not holding their hand. 

Also if a kid can walk but is too young to understand fully about not running away and the road isn't it better for them to be able to walk with a leash than keeping them strapped in a buggy for longer? It's just a useful option.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adorkable
9 minutes ago, Hermione said:

It doesn't though because you can take the exact same action if they misbehave or try to escape etc if they have the reins on. Just like how you can still teach them about not running away and road safety if you're holding their hand as opposed to not holding their hand. 

Also if a kid can walk but is too young to understand fully about not running away and the road isn't it better for them to be able to walk with a leash than keeping them strapped in a buggy for longer? It's just a useful option.

I really don't agree at all. You need to teach the child that there is consequences to their actions. If they want to go for a walk they need to learn that they can't run away. If they want to go to an amusement park, they need to learn they need to stay close to mom and dad. I used to try and turn things into games with my kids. Even before they can speak, I would tell them that they can run until I tell them to freeze. Thing 1 and Thing 2 walked at 10 months and it didn't take long for them to learn. Were they perfect, hell no. Like I said, sometimes I didn't do things I wanted to do, or I left early or sometimes I would bring my mother or sister to help. But they learned early on that doing certain things was a privilege and they had to listen to be able to do them. In theory you can do the same kind of teaching with a leash, but the kids are young not stupid and they will learn also that they can take advantage because there is some security with the leash. Mom tells me not to run, but if I do she will just stop me. I just really don't think it is the right way to teach a young child. 

Everybody parents differently, and there is no wrong way to try and teach kids, but a leash is just something I could never do to my kids. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Billie Hoe
1 hour ago, DeJennsitized said:

There's nothing to stop you teaching your child to behave in public whilst still having the leash/rein on them in case they run off and you can't find them. Taking them away if they continue to run off can still happen - I'd just consider the leash as a safety net. And certain kids just can't be taught for any number of reasons (ADHD, special needs) so I think it's good to have it as an option. 

But what's the point of teaching your kid what to do or not to do in certain situations when you're gonna put them on the leash anyway? You show your child that you don't trust them and your child will notice that and remember it.

I know every child is different and I'm not a mother but I worked in a kindergarten for quite some time, and we could convince even the most active, rowdy child to not run away, because they knew there would be consequences. If they stepped out of line, they would have to take a teacher's hand and walk with them instead of with their friend or they would be put in a little wagon with the littlest of our children. And all those kids were no more than 3 years old. They understood that and listened, because they didn't want to face the consequences. We were 3 adults amongst 15 toddlers and we managed to take walks and do little trips perfectly fine without leashes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×