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Some FAQ Answered

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Since I started sharing my artwork and photography on the internet there have been a couple questions that keep coming up. I figured now is a better time then never to answer some of these questions.

What materials do you use?

I use a vast selection on materials depending on what I am working on. It has become a rather large collection of charcoal, graphite pencils, coloured pencils, easers, blenders, paints, paint brushes, palette knives and many other things. Brands are mixed and include Prism Color, Derwent, and Faber-Castell colour pencils. Variety of paint brands, though I now lean towards Winder and Newton. I use both Canson and Stonehenge paper for drawing and I stretch and prime my own canvases. I also use golden varnishes to seal drawings.

Here a glance and the stuff the gets used a fair amount.

Supplies_zps1e355295.jpg

How long does a drawing take?

Ha, Drawings are often done over a period of time, as I can only work on them when I find time to do so. They are often worked on and off over a period of months, unless I have a deadline. But the actually work time put into a drawing ranges from 15 hours to 50 hours. Depends on the size and medium.

Where did you learn to draw and paint?

I was introduced to painting by my grandmother when I was 4 or 5 years old, pretty sure I still have my first watercolour painting somewhere. I pursued painting in post secondary education where you were introduced to techniques and styles. When it comes to drawing I am completely self taught, through trail and error and lots and lots of practice.

Do you sell your work and if so how much does it cost?

I do sell most of my work, if I didn't I am pretty sure I'd be swimming in art work by now. I remember selling work years ago for like $20 and being so excited that I sold my art work to someone. Now it goes for a fair amount more. A drawing that I put 30 - 50 hours into sells for $400 - $600.

I also sell prints of my work which is much cheaper then the price tag on the original work. http://www.redbubble.com/people/burkefinearts/portfolio

Do you take requests?

I always consider requests, but I can not guarantee I'll ever get the chance to do them.




4 Comments

Posted

That's all interesting! I've got a couple of questions, too, if it doesn't bother you too much:

What's the difference between Derwent and Faber Castell? It's not the first time I see excellent drawings colored with both of them, so I'm curious :)

Also, about blenders... Are they difficult to use?

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Posted

That's all interesting! I've got a couple of questions, too, if it doesn't bother you too much:

What's the difference between Derwent and Faber Castell? It's not the first time I see excellent drawings colored with both of them, so I'm curious :)

Also, about blenders... Are they difficult to use?

I used the soft Derwent pencils, and they tend to be one of the softer coloured pencils, and easy to blend, but with that softness it becomes hard to create exact details. The faber-Castell pencils are a harder lead, still pretty blendable but I use them for finer details mainly.

Blenders are a wonderful tool for blending and cheap to. They can be a little tricky at first, but I found it was just a matter of getting used to it. But that it what a sketch book is for, practice. Make sure you have sand paper handy as that is how you clean the ends.

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Posted

I used the soft Derwent pencils, and they tend to be one of the softer coloured pencils, and easy to blend, but with that softness it becomes hard to create exact details. The faber-Castell pencils are a harder lead, still pretty blendable but I use them for finer details mainly.

Blenders are a wonderful tool for blending and cheap to. They can be a little tricky at first, but I found it was just a matter of getting used to it. But that it what a sketch book is for, practice. Make sure you have sand paper handy as that is how you clean the ends.

Thank you very much for your precious suggestions! Mmm I could buy a blender next time I'll go downtown :)

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Posted

I had no idea you sold prints. :o

I might consider buying some of your cards for my friends. They are all really amazing. :wub:

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